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Maria Callas

Monday, September 26, 2016


Royal Opera House

September 16

Norma musical highlight: ‘Casta diva’

Royal Opera HouseSonya Yoncheva as Norma in Norma, The Royal Opera © 2016 ROH. Photograph by Bill Cooper ‘Casta diva’ is an aria from Vincenzo Bellini ’s 1831 opera Norma . It takes place in Act I, shortly after the title character’s first entrance. Bellini originally wrote the role for his friend Giuditta Pasta and the part is considered one of the most challenging roles in the repertory – for a variety of reasons, although particularly the music. It requires a flexible voice that also has tremendous power over a wide range. ‘Casta diva’ is a prime example not only of bel canto (the generic term for a style of music popular in early 19th-century Italy, where high importance is placed on vocal beauty), but also of Bellini’s own distinctive style. Where does it take place in the opera? ‘Casta diva’ takes place in Act I scene 3. Before the aria, we have encountered Norma’s father Oroveso and his followers. They’re eager for war, but they have to wait for approval from Norma, who as priestess has the final say. We then meet Norma’s secret lover Pollione, an enemy of her people. We learn that he’s fallen out of love with Norma and wishes to abandon her and their two children. Then comes ‘Casta diva’. In the preceding recitative Norma argues with Oroveso about the need for war; in the aria itself she leads her people in a serene prayer for peace. This calm doesn’t last long, though – soon Pollione’s outrageous behaviour will lead Norma to give the signal for war. What do the words mean? Read our line-by-line translation of librettist Felice Romani ’s original Italian text, created in 2016 by Royal Opera House surtitler Kenneth Chalmers: Recitative: ‘Sediziose voci, voci di guerra’ Norma Sediziose voci, voci di guerra Avvi chi alzarsi attenta Presso all’ara del Dio? V’ha chi presume Dettar responsi alla veggente Norma, E di Roma affrettar il fato arcano? Ei non dipende, no, non dipende Da potere umano.Oroveso E fino a quando oppressi Ne vorrai tu? Contaminate assai Non fur le patrie selve E i templi aviti Dall’aquile latine? Omai di Brenno oziosa Non può starsi la spada.Chorus Si brandisca una volta! Norma E infranta cada. Infranta, sì, se alcun di voi snudarla Anzi tempo pretende. Ancor non sono della nostra vendetta i dì maturi. Delle sicambre scuri Sono i pili romani ancor più forti. Oroveso and Chorus E che t’annunzia il Dio? Parla! Quai sorti? Norma Io ne’ volumi arcani leggo del cielo, In pagine di morte Della superba Roma è scritto il nome. Ella un giorno morrà, Ma non per voi. Morrà pei vizi suoi, Qual consunta morrà. L’ora aspettate, l’ora fatal Che compia il gran decreto. Pace v’intimo E il sacro vischio io mieto. Norma Are there those who would call for rebellion and war at the altar of god? Would some put words into the mouth of the prophetess Norma and hasten Rome’s unknown fate? It does not depend on human might.Oroveso How long would you have us oppressed? Have our woods and the temples of our ancestors not been tainted enough by Roman symbols? The sword of Brennus cannot now lie idle.Chorus Raise it up! Norma And it will shatter and fall. Yes, shatter if any one of you tries to unsheathe it before time. The time of our revenge has yet to come. Roman spears are still more mighty than the axes of the Sicambri Oroveso and Chorus What has god told you? What is our fate? Norma I read the secrets in the stars. Proud Rome’s name is written on the page of death. One day she will die, but not through your doing. She will die eaten away by her own vices. Wait for the fateful hour when this will come to pass I counsel peace, and gather sacred mistletoe. Aria: ‘Casta diva’ Casta diva, che inargenti Queste sacre antiche piante, Al noi volgi il bel sembiante, Senza nube e senza vel!Tempra, o Diva, Tempra tu de’ cori ardenti, Tempra ancora lo zelo audace. Spargi in terra quella pace Che regnar tu fai nel ciel. Chaste goddess, you cast a silver light upon these age-old, sacred trees. Turn your lovely face to us unclouded and unveiled.O goddess, calm the fire that burns in these hearts Calm their fearless zeal. Spread across the earth that same peace that rules the heavens by your power. What makes the music so memorable? Verdi once praised Bellini’s ‘long, long, long melodies; melodies such as no one had written before him’. ‘Casta diva’, along with several other passages from Norma, exemplify this trait. In the aria Norma sings in incredibly long, smooth lines, embellished with the intricate ornamentation that is a distinctive feature of bel canto. The accompanying orchestration is initially quite light, with lilting strings and a flute obbligato in counterpoint to Norma’s voice. Bellini gradually thickens the orchestral sound and adds in a sotto voce chorus, to build the aria in a long crescendo that is a superb intensification of this ardent prayer for peace. Take a look at the full score of ‘Casta diva’ (from p.115 for the recitative, from p.123 for the aria), from IMSLP . Norma’s other musical highlights Norma is one of Bellini’s greatest works and the piece as a whole makes for thrilling drama. The love triangle of Norma, Pollione and Norma’s rival Adalgisa requires three exceptional singers, and Bellini draws on their skills to the full in the intense trio ‘Oh! di qual sei tu vittima’ that ends Act I (an innovation of Bellini’s, replacing the more usual chorus number). Norma and Adalgisa share two wonderful duets ‘Sola, furtiva, al tempio’ and ‘Si, fino all’ore estreme’, their voices entwining in rapturous beauty, while the fiery Norma/Pollione duet ‘In mia man alfin tu sei’ is irresistible in quite a different way. The war-hungry chorus sing a violent hymn in ‘Guerra, guerra! Le galliche selve’, while the long Act II finale ‘Qual cor tradisti’ brings the opera to its overwhelming climax. Classic recordings Maria Callas is Norma’s most famous exponent and made it a signature role. She made numerous recordings but musicologist Roger Parker for Radio 3 selected her recording with Tullio Serafin for La Scala, Milan , as his favourite. Montserrat Caballé is probably the only other 20th-century singer really to challenge Callas’s dominance, but recordings by Joan Sutherland , Shirley Verrett , Beverly Sills , Renata Scotto and Anita Cerquetti also have their merits (and I've probably missed out somebody’s favourite). More recently, Cecilia Bartoli has made the role her own, particularly in an acclaimed recording with Giovanni Antonini and the period-instrument band Orchestra La Scintilla. More to discover If you’ve gobbled up ‘Casta diva’ then other Bellini works will be worth a look, particularly I puritani and I Capuleti e i Montecchi . Other bel canto works that probably influenced Bellini include Spontini ’s La vestale and Donizetti ’s Anna Bolena . The influence of Norma itself stretched far and can be seen in many of Verdi’s operas – difficult to pick just one but you could choose Ernani , Luisa Miller , Stiffelio and the trio of Rigoletto , La traviata and Il trovatore . Even the notoriously picky Wagner was a Norma fan, and that influence can be seen particularly in the early Das Liebesverbot . Into the 20th century ‘Casta diva’ is strikingly quoted in Hans Krása ’s Verlobung im Traum – a superb but sadly overlooked work now available in recording . Norma runs 12 September–8 October 2016. Tickets are still available, and every Friday until Friday 7 October further tickets will be made available through Friday Rush . The production is a co-production with Opéra national de Paris and is given with generous philanthropic support from Mrs Susan A. Olde OBE and The Tsukanov Family Foundation.

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

September 18

‘I am not an optimist’: The French world view of Maria Callas

Her wonderfully composed television interview with Bernard Gavoty has been published with English titles. Watch here . Continues here. Alternative source:




Royal Opera House

September 14

Update for Friends of Covent Garden: September 2016

The Paul Hamlyn Hall Champagne Bar in the Royal Opera House © Royal Opera House Restaurants Welcome to the new Season which has truly opened with a bang. Bellini ’s Norma has not been seen at the Royal Opera House for a very long time and whenever performances of this opera at Covent Garden are mentioned, it is usually in the context of Maria Callas or Joan Sutherland's iconic performances of the role. This week saw Sonya Yoncheva take on the mantle, giving a stunning opening night performance which was very much her own. If you've seen the production, do add your reaction to our round-up of press and audience opinions . If you aren't able to attend a performance of Norma at Covent Garden, I would strongly recommend seeing it live in cinemas around the world on 26 September. We also recently live-streamed an Insight event with Antonio Pappano exploring Bellini's score, which is now available to watch on-demand via the Royal Opera House YouTube channel . Following the return of our much-loved production of Il barbiere di Siviglia starring Javier Camarena and Daniela Mack on Tuesday (which opened to stellar reviews from audiences and critics alike ), we soon look forward to the premiere of Jan Philipp Gloger 's new production of Così fan tutte . One of the great pleasures of working at the Royal Opera House is listening to the stage tannoy, which relays the sound of performances and rehearsals from the auditorium around the building. We've thoroughly enjoyed listening to the production's exciting young cast preparing for opening night and I can't wait to experience the full production. For a first glimpse of the production, we'll be live-streaming an Insight event via YouTube on 15 September . Do also keep an eye on our website, which will soon feature an interview with Semyon Bychkov , as well as rehearsal photography. Preparations for the opening of The Royal Ballet's Season are also underway, with less than two weeks until the first performance of Frederick Ashton 's charming La Fille mal gardée . The upcoming run features some very exciting casts, featuring both debuts and Company A-listers alike. I'd expect many of our ballet audience will be coming back throughout the run to experience the various interpretations offered by the many casts on show. In the ballet rehearsal studios high above the stage, Wayne McGregor has been busy developing his new (as-yet untitled) work , set to a score by influential minimalist composer Steve Reich . As many of you will be aware, the 2016/17 Season marks Wayne's tenth year working with the Company. He has truly pushed the boundaries of what a classical ballet company can be in this time, and we look forward to celebrating his association with the Company both during his upcoming mixed programme in November, and with the revival of the Olivier Award -winning Woolf Works later in the Season. I would like to thank everyone who joined, renewed or upgraded their membership in the last few months. Your support is greatly appreciated. Please note that The Royal Opera House Magazine for the Spring 2017 has now gone to print, and will be posted to you in the first week of October.

Royal Opera House

September 13

Your Reaction: What did you think of Bellini's Norma?

Sonya Yoncheva in Àlex Ollé's Norma, The Royal Opera © 2016 ROH. Photograph by Bill Cooper One space-hopper, two sets of Beats by Dre and a LOT of crucifixes #ROHNorma pic.twitter.com/OQezWXtjbF — Alice Jones (@alicevjones) September 12, 2016 Brave attempt for the principals' role debut. They did not disappoint in showcasing their voice and techniques beautifully.#ROHnorma — Wisdom Hill (@Scarlet2046) September 12, 2016 I suppose that just one opera staged as the composer intended would be too much to ask for? Just one? #rohnorma #rohlucia #rohlescaut — Charles Tansley (@SquareAlbert) September 12, 2016 Set in different time/place/religion but emotions are all there and it works, well, rocks actually. #ROHnorma — Yosh M (@yoshkosh10) September 12, 2016 Production photo of Àlex Ollé's Norma, The Royal Opera © 2016 ROH. Photograph by Bill Cooper Clever, inspired & visually striking ROHnorma production by Àlex Ollé & team. Didn't sugar the pill by setting it in a cozy mythical past. — David Cloke (@DavidCloke) September 12, 2016 Newsflash @sonyayoncheva does not sound like Maria Callas and surely never meant to.That being said she is fabulous in the lead of #ROHnorma — Martin L. (@bkkml01) September 12, 2016 Really enjoyed #ROHnorma despite being a little distracted by Watership Down on tv. But great stuff. Congrats to all! — Chrissie Bates (@ChrissieBates_) September 12, 2016 Visually stunning, beautiful singing from @sonyayoncheva but overall impact short of potential - let's give it time #ROHnorma — adm (@alandmclean) September 13, 2016 Sonya Yoncheva in Àlex Ollé's Norma, The Royal Opera © 2016 ROH. Photograph by Bill Cooper Less convinced by this production than by the Caurier/Leiser, but #ROHnorma is visually striking, and who doesn't love a space hopper — Jamie Henderson (@jsdhenderson) September 12, 2016 Basic idea of converting druids to Catholics also makes lot of the libretto nonsensical. Will be an insuperable problem for some...#ROHnorma — Ed Beveridge (@dredbeveridge) September 12, 2016 @RoyalOperaHouse amazing, I'm sure #ROHnorma will be quoted as a classic for generations to come — Dave Thornton (@thornton_dt) September 12, 2016 #ROHnorma can't wait to see this again. Got a return for 4 October! Amazing luck. Totally adore this production. Beautiful and brilliant ☺ — Mark Richards (@MarkRic85498153) September 12, 2016 Press reviews: Bachtrack ★★★★ Evening Standard ★★★★ The Arts Desk ★★★ Guardian ★★★ The Stage ★★★ iNews ★★★ What did you think of Norma? Let us know via the comments below. Norma runs until 8 October 2016. A limited number of tickets are still available . The production will be relayed live to cinemas on 26 September 2016. Find your nearest cinema and sign up to our mailing list .



Royal Opera House

September 5

Opera Essentials: Bellini’s Norma

The story begins… The priestess Norma has had an illicit affair with Pollione, an officer in the forces occupying her land, and has had two children by him. Pollione has now tired of Norma and taken up with the younger priestess Adalgisa. Meanwhile, Norma’s people cry out for rebellion against the occupying forces. Will Norma take revenge on Pollione, and will her people discover her secret? A clever composite Norma is based on the verse tragedy of the same name by the French poet Alexandre Soumet . Bellini ’s librettist Romani also referred to a range of other sources, including Chateaubriand ’s novel Les Martyrs, Jouy ’s libretto for Spontini ’s opera La Vestale, and his own librettos for two other operas dealing with infanticide and ancient religions: Medea in Corinto and La sacerdotessa d’Irminsul. Bellini played a key role in the construction of the libretto for Norma and was instrumental in devising the opera’s dramatic and romantic final scene, entirely his and Romani’s invention. Long, long melodies Bellini’s gift for writing ‘long, long melodies’ (as described by Verdi ) is finely expressed in Norma, particularly in the heroine’s Act I aria ‘Casta diva’, one of the most famous of soprano arias. The opera also contains some of Bellini’s most emotionally potent duets, including the Act II duets ‘Mira, o Norma’ for Norma and Adalgisa and ‘In mia man alfin tu sei’ for Norma and Pollione. An opera conceived for star singers The cast of Norma at its premiere in Milan in December 1831 included two of the greatest sopranos of Bellini’s day – Giuditta Pasta as Norma and Giulia Grisi as Adalgisa. Subsequently, Norma has been a defining role for many distinguished sopranos, including Lilli Lehmann , Rosa Ponselle , Joan Sutherland and Maria Callas , who made a sensational Covent Garden debut as Norma in 1952. A contemporary heroine Àlex Ollé sets Norma’s story in a contemporary society in which religion and political power have become the same thing. Norma is trapped between her personal desires and the constraints and conventions of her society, and forced to choose between being true to herself or defending her religion and complying with its social demands. Her eventual actions can be seen as a defence of the individual’s freedom, and a denouncement of intolerance. Norma runs 12 September–8 October 2016. Tickets are still available, and every Friday from Friday 9 September to Friday 7 October inclusive further tickets will be made available through Friday Rush . The production is a co-production with Opéra national de Paris and is given with generous philanthropic support from Mrs Susan A. Olde OBE and The Tsukanov Family Foundation.

Royal Opera House (The Guardian)

September 2

Why La Fura’s Norma is playing with fire at Covent Garden

With its chilling nods to druidic practices, Islamic State and hardline Catholicism, La Fura dels Baus’s new production of Bellini’s Norma packs a political punch – but how will it fare with the purists?Bellini operas are like buses. Six months after English National Opera unveiled its first ever production of the composer’s masterpiece Norma, over at Covent Garden, the same work is about to appear for the first time in nearly 30 years. A couple of weeks ago, at the Edinburgh festival, another version was performed. The production starred Cecilia Bartoli, who, despite being incontrovertibly a mezzo, triumphed in one of the toughest soprano roles. In the world of opera, 2016 will be remembered as the year the druidic diva returned.Of these new Normas, the Royal Opera’s reimagining is perhaps the most intriguing. Directed by the renegade Catalan collective La Fura dels Baus, it relocates Bellini’s Roman-occupied Gaul brusquely to the present: druidic robes are replaced by the uniforms of hard-right Christian groups; gloomy temples are abandoned in favour of sleek modern apartments. Outside the opera world, the company, founded in 1979, is still best known for the opening ceremony of the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, an awe-inspiring if perplexing spectacle in which 2,000 blue-cape-wearing volunteers impersonated the Mediterranean sea. At Covent Garden, one wonders if the shade of Maria Callas – who made her debut as Norma here in the early 1950s, where it remained her favourite role – knows what she is in for. Related: Norma/ACO at Edinburgh festival review – Cecilia Bartoli set the night ablaze Continue reading...

Maria Callas
(1923 – 1977)

Maria Callas (December 2, 1923 - September 16, 1977) was an American-born Greek soprano and one of the most renowned opera singers of the 20th century. She combined an impressive bel canto technique, a wide-ranging voice and great dramatic gifts. An extremely versatile singer, her repertoire ranged from classical opera seria to the bel canto operas of Donizetti, Bellini and Rossini; further, to the works of Verdi and Puccini; and, in her early career, to the music dramas of Wagner. Her remarkable musical and dramatic talents led to her being hailed as La Divina.



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